Healthy Tips

The flu season is upon us, come get vaccinated!

Who is at high risk for developing flu-related complications?

Flu Shots in Las Cruces NM

  • Children younger than 5, but especially children younger than 2 years old
  • Adults 65 years of age and older
  • Pregnant women
  • American Indians and Alaskan Natives seem to be at higher risk of flu complications
  • People who have medical conditions including:
    • Asthma (even if it’s controlled or mild)
    • Neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions [including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy (seizure disorders), stroke, intellectual disability (mental retardation), moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury]
    • Chronic lung disease (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and cystic fibrosis)
    • Heart disease (such as congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease)
    • Blood disorders (such as sickle cell disease)
    • Endocrine disorders (such as diabetes mellitus)
    • Kidney disorders
    • Liver disorders
    • Metabolic disorders (such as inherited metabolic disorders and mitochondrial disorders)
    • Weakened immune system due to disease or medication (such as people with HIV or AIDS, or cancer, or those on chronic steroids)
    • People younger than 19 years of age who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy
    • People who are morbidly obese (Body Mass Index [BMI] of 40 or greater)

Who else should get vaccinated?

Other people for whom vaccination is especially important are:

  • People who live in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
  • People who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from flu, including:
  • Health care workers
  • Household contacts of persons at high risk for complications from the flu
  • Household contacts and caregivers of children younger than 5 years of age with particular emphasis on vaccinating contacts of children younger than 6 months of age (children younger than 6 months are at highest risk of flu-related complications but are too young to get vaccinated)

Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.

Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

  • If you get the flu, antiviral drugs can treat your illness.
  • Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) and are not available over-the-counter.
  • Antiviral drugs can make illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious flu complications.
  • It's very important that antiviral drugs be used early (within the first 2 days of symptoms) to treat people who are very sick (such as those who are hospitalized) or people who are sick with flu symptoms and who are at increased risk of severe flu illness, such as pregnant women, young children, people 65 and older and people with certain chronic health conditions.
  • Flu-like symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. Some people also may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, and have respiratory symptoms without a fever.
  • Please call the clinic if you have any of these symptoms and if you need more information on the flu visit
    CDC's website.

Content Of Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention 

Healthy Tips for summer

Summer is a great time to build up your fitness program, enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, take a vacation, and have fun. It's also a time to pay attention to your health and safety. Below are tips to help you stay safe and healthy this summer and all year long.

Be water-savvy

In 2006, males were three times more likely than females to die from unintentional drownings in the United States. Alcohol use is involved in up to half of adolescent and adult deaths associated with water recreation.

Tips:

  • Learn how to swim. Never swim alone.
  • Wear your life jacket while boating.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages while boating.
  • Watch children in and around water.
  • If you have a swimming pool at your home, install a four-sided isolation pool fence

Keep your cool in the sun

Sun protection is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach. Take steps to help prevent skin cancer and other conditions.

Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable, yet many people succumb to extreme heat each year. Take steps to lower your risk for heat-related illness.

Tips:
  • When possible, avoid outdoor activities during midday, when the sun's rays are strongest.
  • Cover up with clothing and a wide-brimmed hat to protect exposed skin.
  • Drink plenty of cool, non-alcoholic fluids.
  • Seek shade.
  • Wear sunscreen and lip screen with a sun protective factor (SPF) of 15 or higher. Remember to reapply it as needed.

Be physically active

The summer is a great time to play outdoor games, garden, or walk. Start a new routine that combines fun and physical activity. Active people are less likely than inactive people to be obese or to have high blood pressure, diabetes, osteoporosis, coronary artery disease and stroke, depression, colon cancer, and premature death.

Tips:

  • Adults should get 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity most, preferably all, days of the week.
  • Children and adolescents should participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity most, preferably all, days of the week.
  • Start at an easy pace and increase time and distance gradually.
  • Don't overdo it. Prevent injuries.

Eat healthy and safe food

Whether you plan to grill on the patio or picnic in the park, be sure to eat balanced meals with plenty of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables have important vitamins, minerals, and fiber that may help protect you from some chronic diseases.

Foodborne disease is caused by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. An estimated 76 million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States. Most of these cases are mild and cause symptoms for a day or two, but some cases are more serious and require hospitalization.

Tips:

  • Eat plenty fruits and vegetables daily.
  • Wash your hands before eating or preparing food.
  • Cook all foods to the proper temperatures.
  • Refrigerate foods promptly.
  • Handle and prepare food safely.

Fight the bite

To lower your risk for West Nile Virus, avoid mosquito bites when you spend time outside working or playing. The risk of severe illness and death is highest for people over 50 years old, although people of all ages can become ill.

Tips:

  • Use mosquito repellent.
  • Install or repair window and door screens.
  • Eliminate mosquito breeding sites.

Practice proper pet care

Your relationship with your pet enriches your life. However, there are a few important tips to keep in mind when you own a pet. Some animals can carry germs that may be transmitted to people.

Tips:

  • Pick the right pet for your family.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly after petting your pet.
  • Get your pet early, regular, and life-long veterinary care.
  • Avoid ticks on dogs and cats.
  • Prevent rabies.
  • Teach children how to properly care for pets.
  • Spay and neuter your pets.
  • Keep wildlife wild.

Content Of Source: Center for Disease Control and Prevention